Feedback Question Regarding Rules


#1
  1. This may be a European versus US notation difference, but I was hoping for clarification regarding “10.000 blocks dephth/highness.” In the US/Canada a “.” (dot) is used for decimals, but it seems in this instance we (US/Canada) would use a “,” comma to indicate ten thousand blocks and not ten blocks exactly. So to me, this rule would indicated as long as I am at least ten blocks under a building I can dig, which I am quite sure that is not the case. If that is the case, then I have possibly dug under other properties without knowing the likelihood that I was breaking the rules. If the intent is in fact ten thousand blocks, then you might write it as “10.000 (10,000 US/Canada) blocks …” This method would make this clear to us on this side of the pond. I am not sure how other English speaking nations use dots & commas in numbers, but I think with this clarification, they would understand what is intended.
  2. dephth” should be “depth
  3. “We ask you to build your automatism Systems with less way for objects as possible.” might be rewritten to something like “We ask you to build your automatism Systems compactly, using the least amount of pipes possible thereby reducing the number of objects in a pipe at any given time.” My revised statement can probably be written in a more concise manner.

I hope this post constitutes a positive construction addition. =)


#2

@ClaudiusMinimus said:

  1. “We ask you to build your automatism Systems with less way for objects as possible.” might be rewritten to something like “We ask you to build your automatism Systems compactly, using the least amount of pipes possible thereby reducing the number of objects in a pipe at any given time.” My revised statement can probably be written in a more concise manner.

acctually i understad better the old one x) (becoulse my not good english :D)


#3

I mentioned this post in the team chat - @dotti had the idea to choose “thin spaces” to make a 10.000 a 10 000. I personally like this idea. (sorry but the thin space doesn’t work for code :D)


#4

It’s not my idea. It’s described in ISO 80000 and ISO 31.


#5

It sure is, but the idea to handle like that came from you.


#6

Most people do not even know what ISO is. To an American, 10000 or 10,000 would be clear. However, 10.000 looks like 10 to an American. Typically, when a conversion is used, we do it like 1 inch (25mm) or 1 mile (1.6 km), so the way I presented it is how Americans are used to seeing numbers like 10,000.

I hope this helps